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Teaching and research laboratories combine to create a new campus gateway and community hub for scientists and students alike

The Ohio State University Wooster New Laboratory Building

Client
The Ohio State University
Location
Wooster, OH
Size
66,000 square feet
Team
Hasenstab Architects
Photographer
Brad Feinknopf
Certifications
LEED Certified
Services
Architecture
Interior Design
Additional Services
Landscape Architecture
Planning and Urban Design
Status
Completed January 2021
Awards
American Society of Interior Designers, Ohio North Chapter, Winner: Education Space
International Interior Design Association, Ohio Kentucky Chapter, Cleveland Akron Interior Design Awards, Best in “LEARN” category
American Institute of Architects, Akron Chapter Design Awards, Honor Award, Interiors

The Ohio State University hired Sasaki to lead the master plan of the Wooster campus and create a vision for merging the research and teaching operations in shared, multipurpose buildings. As a result, Sasaki, together with Hasenstab Architects, won the commission to implement the first building. The new building provides replacement laboratory space for entomologists, new chemistry teaching labs, and a bug zoo for outreach to primary schools in the region.

Founded in 1892 as the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, the campus has a long history of serving as a resource for the farming community, and a center for both field and molecular research to improve crop yield and quality as well as animal and human health. Pollinator and demonstration gardens surround the new lab building creating a unique and welcoming new front door to the Wooster campus.

Learning environments are concentrated at the first floor along with research space, which is highly visible from the public areas. Entomology research labs accommodate teams that use bugs as model systems to study the impact of climate change, disease, and crop production at both the molecular and macro scale. The result is a diverse array of lab spaces from “dirty” field labs for sorting crop samples at the ground level to “clean” labs on the upper floors.

Lab Planning

The lab planning approach began by quantifying the variety of research teams and their required footprints. Often the footprints could be reduced when equipment and space is shared. The final space programming for researchers includes wet lab space, shared lab support space, and office and meeting areas for the teams.

For more information contact Victor Vizgaitis.

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